Germany: Pussy Riyadh goes on a European tour to help Ukraine

Published

Members of the Russian punk group, Putin’s staunchest opponents, began a series of concerts in Berlin on Thursday evening to raise funds for NGOs working in the conflict.

Maria Alyogina (left) and Olga Borisova (right) on stage in Berlin on Thursday night made the Russian feminist group Pussy Riot the Kremlin's pet.

Maria Alyogina (left) and Olga Borisova (right) on stage in Berlin on Thursday night made the Russian feminist group Pussy Riot the Kremlin’s pet.

AFP

Members of Pussy Riot launched a series of concerts in Berlin condemning the war waged by Vladimir Putin’s regime and raising funds for aid organizations in Ukraine. The Russian feminist punk group rose to fame in 2012 after an outrageous event at the Cathedral of Christ the Savior in Moscow. The young women in the group sang a punk “prayer” to “expel” the Virgin Mary from Putin. Three of them, including Maria Alyogina, were sentenced to two years in prison in a camp and sentenced for acts considered defamatory. From Pussy Rebellion They continue to warn against the “dictatorship” that has developed under the rule of the Russian president.

Maria Alyogina, one of the members of the group, left the country illegally, disguised as a caterer, and was able to come to the Pussy Riot Collective for her first concert on stage, Thursday evening, in Funcas, Berlin. For two years. “Slava Ukrainian!” (“Glory to Ukraine!”), He began during this concert. Maria Alyogina, 33, crossed the border into Belarus and arrived in Germany via Lithuania and Iceland.

“Pucha! பூச்சா! Poocha! ”

Combining video predictions, words and chanted rap against the backdrop of saxophone, acid jazz and electronic beats, artists condemn the Putinian system for linking repression at home and aggression abroad. The show has seemed a bit unfocused in recent episodes, however; “Pucha! பூச்சா! Poocha! ” Maria Alyogina shouts when the name of the martyred city appears in red on the screen.

Prior to the event, Maria Alyogina explained that she wanted to use the group’s insult to focus on Vladimir Putin’s “crimes.” “Now we have the worst censorship in Russia, and you could face up to 15 years in prison for posting photos of Poucha,” he said in English.

Western nations, these “hypocrites”

Last September, Maria Alyogina was given one year of “freedom” (judicial restraint, night curfew, ban on leaving Moscow) for calling for a demonstration against the arrest of her main Russian opponent, Alexei Navalny. But in September, the Russian judiciary tightened the measures, turning them into prison sentences.

According to her, it is important that Western public opinion use their freedoms to put pressure on their governments not to compromise in the face of the Kremlin. “The most important thing is not to be indifferent about the situation and not to pretend it does not exist,” he told reporters. “People are dying in Russia, people are going to jail, the worst negligence for me,” he said.

Olga Borissova, another member of the Pussy Riot, accused the West of “hypocrisy” for not taking drastic action against Moscow after annexing Crimea in 2014 and for continuing to import Russian gas. “Stop buying (Russian) oil and gas because this money is being used to imprison us, to fight against the opposition, to repress and kill innocent Ukrainians,” he said.

(AFP)

See also  The most political Labor Day between the two elections

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.