Officially appointed Prime Minister Rishi Sunak warned of “difficult decisions”.

Rishi Sunak has announced he will take “tough decisions” to right the “mistakes” made under Lis Truss, who was forced to resign after the financial storm caused by his economic plan. “I will put economic stability and confidence at the heart of this government’s plan. It means tough decisions have to be made,” the new Prime Minister said in her first address from the steps of 10 Downing Street.

Rishi Sunak, who was charged by King Charles III on Tuesday to form a government, became the third prime minister in two months in a country plunged into deep economic and social crisis. This made him the first British leader of Indian origin, Hindu faith and a former British colony. At 42, he is the youngest head of government in the United Kingdom’s modern history, after a stellar rise in politics.

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Liz Truss, thrust into the starting position after the storm over her massive tax cut plan, wished her successor “every success” in the world, “for the good of our country” and in a plea for courage in power, Roman quoted. Philosopher Seneca: “We do not dare because things are difficult, but because we do not dare that they are difficult.”

First to Charles III

Taking his lightning decree marked by the death and funeral of Queen Elizabeth II and the ascension of Charles III to the throne, he underlined the support afforded to households amid rising energy bills. He then went to Buckingham Palace to hand in his resignation letter to King Charles III.

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This was the first time that Charles III had appointed a head of government. Liz Truss is greeted by Elizabeth II during an audience at the Scottish castle of Balmoral on September 6. The 96-year-old sovereign died two days later.

Boris Johnson, who was pressured to resign earlier in the summer, tweeted for his part: ‘Congratulations to Rishi Sunak on this historic day, time for every Tory to bring their full support to our new First Minister.’

No early election

Rishi Sunak takes over a country facing severe economic and social crisis. Inflation is over 10%, the highest in the G7. Energy prices, food prices are rising. There is a risk of recession. He was supposed to calm the markets, shocked by the Truce government’s budget announcements at the end of September, as much of the disaster was canceled.

Rishi Sunak comes to power in a period of unprecedented instability. The British prime minister has been in office for the fifth time since the 2016 referendum to leave the European Union. After twelve years in power, he became leader of a deeply divided conservative party. Rishi Sunak has warned MPs in his camp to “unite or die” as the Labor opposition gains ground in the polls two years to the general election.

Rishi Sunak ruled out early elections demanded by the Labor Party. But according to an Ipsos poll published on Monday, 62% of voters want such a ballot by the end of 2022. According to a YouGov poll, only 38% of Britons are satisfied that Rishi Sunak will become their Prime Minister.

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Which project?

This early Brexiteer needs to quickly set up a government for a pragmatic Labour, both to guarantee the markets and satisfy his majority clans at the risk of suffering the same fate as Liz Truss. He also had to explain his intentions: he did not speak during the Tories’ lightning campaign, which began on Thursday. After the resignation of former prime minister Boris Johnson and his opponent Benny Mordant’s failure to secure the necessary 100 sponsored delegates, he imposed himself without a program or a vote from members.

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During the previous campaign, last summer, he was attacked by Liz Truss, this former Chancellor of the Exchequer (2020-2022) emphasized the need to fight against inflation, qualifying his “fairy tale” promises to reduce taxes. the enemy On immigration, he said he supported a highly controversial plan to deport illegal immigrants in the UK to Rwanda, which was currently being blocked.

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