Oceania: China has refused to set up a military base in the Solomon Islands

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The Chinese foreign minister, who visited the Pacific archipelago on Thursday, dismissed the Western camp’s concerns following the signing of a security agreement between his country and the Solomon Islands.

The Solomon Islands and China, which fly flags in Beijing's Tiananmen Square, have signed a security agreement that has raised concerns in the United States and Australia over the presence of Chinese troops in the archipelago.

The Solomon Islands and China, which fly flags in Beijing’s Tiananmen Square, have signed a security agreement that has raised concerns in the United States and Australia over the presence of Chinese troops in the archipelago.

REUTERS

Foreign Minister Wang Yi said on Thursday that China had no plans to set up a military base in the Solomon Islands, citing a new security agreement signed between the two countries. The Minister rejected it Concerns The Western camp, especially Australia and the United States, fear that the deal will allow Beijing to establish a military presence on the archipelago. He said the deal was “flawless, fair and honest”.

Wang Li began on Thursday in Honolulu, the capital of the Solomon Islands, where he toured several South Pacific countries, where he will discuss key efforts to expand security and free trade cooperation in the region. A draft agreement, the final version of which has not been released, contains a provision authorizing the deployment of Chinese naval forces on an island less than 2,000 kilometers from Australia. The agreement was “not imposed on anyone, it is not aimed at any third party, it has no intention of establishing a military base,” Wang Li told a news conference after meeting his counterpart Jeremiah Manel in the Solomon Islands.

Mature Government of Australia, The loser in the May 21 election had warned that building a military base would be a “red line” and did not mention the consequences of the crossing. The Chinese diplomat was asked not to “interfere” or “disturb” China’s cooperation. Island nations Pacific “.” They have no backyard. All Pacific island nations have the right to choose their own choice instead of following others, “the foreign minister said through a translator.

“In light of the needs and demands of the Solomon Islands, the Security Agreement should assist the Solomon Islands government in maintaining long-term stability and security,” he said. In November, protests against the Prime Minister of the Solomon Islands, Manasseh Chokavare, escalated into riots in the capital, sparking widespread unrest in Chinatown. The unrest “poses a serious threat to the lives and property of the Chinese community in this country,” Wang Li said.

(AFP)

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