Trent Research Targets Reducing Mining Operations’ GHGs

New funding supports project using mine tailings to capture CO2

Trent University is leading research on helping mining operations reduce their greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs).

The university is studying methods for removing carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere by capturing and storing it in mine tailings, which will offset GHGs.

The research received a boost this week. Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) announced the support of $2 million through its Clean Growth Program for an initiative that will apply research by Dr. Ian Power, Canada Research Chair in Environmental Geoscience and assistant professor in the Trent School of the Environment.

“We are immensely proud of this collaborative piece of work between industry and academia, and with excellent progress in the project to date there is great potential to achieve carbon-neutral mining operations at sites where this type of rock is present.”

“The support from NRCan’s Clean Growth Program will accelerate our research that has the potential to lead towards carbon-neutral mining in the future,” says Dr. Power in a news release.

“Trent University will lead pilot projects that are designed to accelerate the natural weathering and mineralization of carbon dioxide by using innovative tailings management practices that can be incorporated into active and closed mines.”

As rocks and minerals weather, CO2 is captured directly from the air. At mines, the crushing and pulverizing of vast quantities of rock dramatically accelerates these natural weathering rates. This process can be further accelerated by maximizing the reaction between CO2 and magnesium silicate-rich mine tailings, Trent says.

The funding from NRCan will launch field trials of tailings management practices at the De Beers Group’s mining operations. These field trials are a collaboration between Trent University, the University of British Columbia (UBC), the University of Alberta, Université INRS, and De Beers Group.

Dr. Power will work with professor Sasha Wilson of the University of Alberta on De Beers’ mining operations.

However, the research and technologies are applicable to other deposit types including nickel, chromium, and platinum.

“We are immensely proud of this collaborative piece of work between industry and academia, and with excellent progress in the project to date there is great potential to achieve carbon-neutral mining operations at sites where this type of rock is present,” says Bruce Cleaver, CEO of De Beers Group.

The funding from NRCan is part of a $155-million investment by the Government of Canada into clean technology research and development in the energy, mining and forestry sectors in Canada.

In this case, the funding will be shared by the project team, along with $675,000 contributed by De Beers Group.

{+/-]

We can chip away at telling the stories, like this one, of Another Peterborough on our own but we could really use your financial support.

If you would like to see more stories like this please consider funding us on Patreon.

Fields marked with an * are required